Internet Waking Dream Blurs Real Life: Oregon “cool” rejects tech’s addictive squandering (English Edition) por Dave Masko

Internet Waking Dream Blurs Real Life: Oregon “cool” rejects tech’s addictive squandering (English Edition) por Dave Masko

Titulo del libro: Internet Waking Dream Blurs Real Life: Oregon “cool” rejects tech’s addictive squandering (English Edition)

Autor: Dave Masko

Número de páginas: 78 páginas

Fecha de lanzamiento: October 6, 2016

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Dave Masko con Internet Waking Dream Blurs Real Life: Oregon “cool” rejects tech’s addictive squandering (English Edition)

Internet Waking Dream Blurs Real Life, by Dave Masko. This reporter does not use a smartphone because there is no need to be “connected to the tech beast all the time. Who wants to be a slave of technology? In fact, tech addiction is as serious as addiction to heroin, say mental health experts. This ambitious collection of “new journalism” essays is a complex portrait of a society ruled by the odious information technology industry. At “ITs” heart is the so-called Internet of things, whose symbolic and ambivalent place in today’s culture is underscored by this waking dream state that is the Internet. The Net blurs the difference between real “human” thoughts and an Orwellian “Big Brother” artificial intelligence (AI) presence that Ken Kesey and other “cool” Oregonians reject because IT limits freedom; while the Sixties mantra here in Oregon is “more freedom is best!” Tech users yearn for love and mercy online, but are left wanting because their encounters with other wired types is either fleeting or curtailed by Silicon Valley forces outside their control. Blending prodigious original new journalism research; including dozens of face-to-face interviews with both current and former digital drug addicts, the author tells the story of all that is wrong with the Internet when it comes to limiting user freedom. Nonetheless, in a tantalizing coda, Dave Masko images what might have been had the Internet become simply a tool like television or radio. Fans say Masko’s Internet-busting e-books derives its energy from a profusion of “cool” Oregonians struggling to stay “free” from a kind of digital brainwashing chorus flooding the Internet of things with Big Brother undercurrents of misinformation because “mistrust” is the hallmark of the all-powerful information technology industry today. Out of the ruins of the Internet’s aim to control users (so they cannot “dislike” anything online or social networking sites), there is a very precarious kind of pluralism blooming that leads users to emotional and intellectual undercurrents of lost and lonely users with their passive consumption of the Internet of things because fully wired users no longer look, search, ask, question, react or even remember when their hearts and minds were nourished by real-life and real people having real face-to-face human conversations. Because nothing online is real or counts, there needs to be a sort of “Internet buster” who is as cool as the late Ken Kesey, and not yet addicted to this frothy activity of stupid busy work online that is nothing more than virtual daydreaming, and seriously harmful to one’s personal freedom. This waking nightmare or dream we call the Internet of things blurs real life; while making users feel even more sad and lonely.